Dishing the Dirt

I?ve been sworn to secrecy over this meal.

Actually environment artist Kerry Morrison and FoodRiot chef Gill Watson?haven?t divulged any details about their banquet. All I know is there?ll be six courses ? related to hunger, soil, pollinators, intensive farming and foraging. Each will have an informed introduction, alongside film and sound to plump out the sensory experience. And there?ll be you.

The plan is for Saturday 24th October, 12-2pm to be a memorable feast. And, like all great banquets, for it to be a communal experience, one where everyone shares their joys and concerns about the food we eat.

Going on what I did learn about the pair, I suspect it?ll be far more than the sum of those parts. Let me introduce you.

Kerry Morrison claims she?s never done anything like this before. Although she has done this and is involved in this, so she?s clearly fascinated by our relationship with nature and how we farm it for our food. She?s an ecologist who believes in the value of everything from slugs (what else, but earthworms, does the job of getting rid of our crap so efficiently?) to dandelions (edible from root to petal). Her interest lies in reconnecting our eating habits with the natural world, and making them responsible, sustainable.

Her own diet includes ?feral? food that is shot locally because of the way we farm; rabbits, deer and pigeons, considered pests and seen as a nuisance to farmers, end up on her plate. From time to time, she has grey squirrels delivered in her local veggie bag. Two years ago it was illegal to release a grey squirrel into the wild if you?d caught it, because they are non-native and considered invasive. Today, to release a grey squirrel you need to apply for a licience. If you are a landowner, the Governmant will fund you to kill grey squirrels. Another example of the paradox what is seen as ?belonging? is the honey bee. This ?national treasure? is actually ? apart from the native black bee – is from Italy. But we love honey, so it must be given a higher status than many other pollinators. Flies on the other hand?

There are no flies on Gill Watson. In the film she talks about the importance of delivering food directly to those who need it rather than relying on food banks. And that falls to her, driving around her area with bags of fruit, veg and bakery goods from Lidl. She?s just acquired a hut, where people can come, without registering or giving personal information, to pick up perfectly good, often prized food that?d otherwise be chucked in order to make space for the next delivery.

While the UK still feels a long way from France where it is illegal to throw away decent food, Gill is convinced every supermarket knows they need to do something to change how they deal with ?waste? food. Through her work with Lidl, since 2014, it?s now company policy that all UK store managers don?t have to get head office to okay the give-away of remainder produce. It?s a big commitment from the supermarkets and from people, like Gill, who are willing to sort through the food to redistribute it: one that asks people to think more deeply about food, what?s out there, what they can eat, and the cost of convenience.

It is this passion, commitment and food knowledge that?ll be served on Saturday 24th October in the Pavilion Theatre in Blackpool Winter Gardens. How can those six courses be anything but delicious, food at its most gourmet: made with love, care and conscience?

For more info and to book a place at the table, phone?01253 477973 or book here